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Grlevel3
09-06-2006, 08:46 PM
Post: #1
Grlevel3
Grlevel3 version 1.11 has been released.
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09-08-2006, 11:44 PM
Post: #2
Grlevel3
OK, most of you guys said you prefer Stormlab over everything else so I decided to give it a whirl. Problem is, I couldn't get it to download. It said something about not being suitable for running MS-DOS and Mocrosoft Widows applications. My PC is a Compaq Presario, only a couple of years old with XP, so don't think it is outdated or anything. I sure did want to give Stormlab a try.

Anyway, I was able to download GRLevel3 with zero problems and have enjoyed it so far. Now, if only I understood some of the abbreviations. I am a complete neophyte to the world of high tech weather watching. I have always been interested, but only since I retired do I have a little time to persue it and I'm lovin it.

So, if anyone had any suggestions as to how to download stormlab or where I can find a glossary for some of the NWS terminology, I would be much obliged.

Don
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09-09-2006, 08:55 PM
Post: #3
Grlevel3
What abbreviations are you having problems with and maybe we can help you out.

Tyler

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09-09-2006, 09:03 PM
Post: #4
Grlevel3
If you email them at [email protected] they can help you with downloading stormlab.Stormlab is great,I've had no major problems with it.*fr
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09-09-2006, 09:09 PM
Post: #5
Grlevel3
Or you could also send a pm to stormalertadmin on this site

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09-09-2006, 11:34 PM
Post: #6
Grlevel3
ROLLTIDE Wrote:Or you could also send a pm to stormalertadmin on this site

I appreciate the suggestions and I'll make another stab at getting Stormlab. I really would like to compare the two apps before shelling out the moola. I did email tech support Friday evening about my problem, but as yet had no reply. Of course, it is the wekend, so not at all upset at not hearing anything. The funny thing is, the Interwarn app loaded just fine.

Anyway, a couple of questions for you:

The little green triangles were explained, but I am wondering about the tiny boxes with what look to be wind barbs on them. Some of the abbreviations in the text boxes associated with them are what I am wondering about, such as POH, POSH (I know those are associated somehow with hail), TVS, and ETVS.

We had some weather this weekend, so I had opportunity to see some of these things. It is so cool. I can't wait until I learn enough to be able to converse at least somewhat intelligently about this stuff.

I did figure that BR 1,2,3 & 4 are different angles of Base Reflectivity, and am wondering what Base Velocity and Storm Relative Velocity are telling me. Also, which ones do you find most helpful? Oh yeah, is there a way to filter out ground clutter?

I am accessing a couple of the basic online met courses and begining to get a little better understanding about some things and a much healthier respect for how difficult a forecaster's job is. So many variables to consider. Wow!

I have only recently dusted off the old ham rig after about fifteen years, and would like to become a SKYWARN volunteer too. I served as a county Emergency Management Coordinator some years back, and appreciated them for their dedication.

Again, thanks for your replies. I'll try not to be a huge bother with a thousand questions.

Don
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09-10-2006, 07:54 AM
Post: #7
Grlevel3
dgal Wrote:The little green triangles were explained, but I am wondering about the tiny boxes with what look to be wind barbs on them. Some of the abbreviations in the text boxes associated with them are what I am wondering about, such as POH, POSH (I know those are associated somehow with hail), TVS, and ETVS.

The green triangles represent storms that have the potential to produce hail(if you see these, the storm is on the stronger, posssibly even severe side) Also, the boxes with "barbs" are the storm tracks. Each barb represents where NEXRAD predicts the storm to be in 15 minutes. The "pop-ups" when you hover over the hail triangles and tracks are what NEXRAD found in the storm. POH is Possibility of Hail, and POSH is Possibility of Severe Hail(and will show a percentage next to these) TVS and ETVS have to do with shear in a storm(TVS is a higher shear than ETVS), although I'm not exactly sure what EXACTLY the abbreviation stands for...

Hope this helps!

Tyler

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09-10-2006, 09:45 AM
Post: #8
Grlevel3
WeatherMan90 Wrote:TVS and ETVS have to do with shear in a storm(TVS is a higher shear than ETVS), although I'm not exactly sure what EXACTLY the abbreviation stands for...

TVS - Tornado vortex signature

ETVS - Elevated tornado vortex signature

However, ETVS is based on early NWS algorithms that have been proven wrong, so if you DO see an ETVS, just ignore.. just know that there is rotation in the storm, but don't rely on the information the ETVS puts out
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09-10-2006, 10:42 AM (This post was last modified: 09-10-2006 10:44 AM by Bryan.)
Post: #9
Grlevel3
The main difference between Base Velocity and Storm Relative velocity is....

1. Base Velocity will give you a display of all raidal velocities returned by targets.
2. Storm Relative Velocity will give you a display of all radial velocities retuned by targets with the storm motion taken away...

Basically, if you are looking for rotation in a storm, the it is best to use Storm Relavite Veloctiy because if you just use base velocity on a fast moving storm, the outbound velocities most likely will be masked by the storm's movement...
For example: A storm 10 miles to your northeast moving northeast at 30 mph will have a weaker presentation of the inbound side of the rotation because the storm is moving away... The opposite is true for the outbound side of the rotation... velocities will see to be higher because the storm is moving away...
So, the Storm Relative Velocity algorithm tries to subtract the storm motion from the velocity wind field to give a truer representation....

It will be easier to pick up on rotation using the Storm Relative Velocity (generally).
When determining severe weather it is best to use more than one product and elevation to see the full picture... Smile

Hope that helps.
Bryan

dgal Wrote:I did figure that BR 1,2,3 & 4 are different angles of Base Reflectivity, and am wondering what Base Velocity and Storm Relative Velocity are telling me. Also, which ones do you find most helpful?
Don
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09-10-2006, 11:36 AM
Post: #10
Grlevel3
Ares Wrote:TVS - Tornado vortex signature

ETVS - Elevated tornado vortex signature

AH! Haha I knew it was somethin like that! Thanks for clearin that up!

Tyler

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