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MILKY WAY TO COLLIDE WITH ANDROMEDA
06-01-2012, 06:16 AM
Post: #1
MILKY WAY TO COLLIDE WITH ANDROMEDA
GOOD NEWS ALL THIS GLOBAL WARM AND GLOBAL COOLING WON'T MATTER IN THE LONG RUN:

FROM NASA NEWS:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sci...andromeda/

Astronomers Predict Titanic Collision: Milky Way vs. Andromeda
Quote:May 31, 2012: NASA astronomers say they can now predict with certainty the next major cosmic event to affect our galaxy, sun, and solar system: the titanic collision of our Milky Way galaxy with the neighboring Andromeda galaxy.

The Milky Way is destined to get a major makeover during the encounter, which is predicted to happen four billion years from now. It is likely the sun will be flung into a new region of our galaxy, but our Earth and solar system are in no danger of being destroyed.

"After nearly a century of speculation about the future destiny of Andromeda and our Milky Way, we at last have a clear picture of how events will unfold over the coming billions of years," says Sangmo Tony Sohn of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore.

"Our findings are statistically consistent with a head-on collision between the Andromeda galaxy and our Milky Way galaxy," adds Roeland van der Marel of the STScI.

[Image: 654284main_i1220bw.jpg]
(The Milky Way and Andromeda are moving toward each other under the inexorable pull of gravity. Also shown is a smaller galaxy, Triangulum, which may be part of the smashup. (Credit: NASA; ESA; A. Feild and R. van der Marel, STScI) )

The solution came through painstaking NASA Hubble Space Telescope measurements of the motion of Andromeda, which also is known as M31. The galaxy is now 2.5 million light-years away, but it is inexorably falling toward the Milky Way under the mutual pull of gravity between the two galaxies and the invisible dark matter that surrounds them both.

The scenario is like a baseball batter watching an oncoming fastball. Although Andromeda is approaching us more than 2,000 times faster than a fastball, it will take 4 billion years before the strike. Computer simulations derived from Hubble's data show that it will take an additional two billion years after the encounter for the interacting galaxies to completely merge under the tug of gravity and reshape into a single elliptical galaxy similar to the kind commonly seen in the local universe.

Although the galaxies will plow into each other, stars inside each galaxy are so far apart that they will not collide with other stars during the encounter. However, the stars will be thrown into different orbits around the new galactic center. Simulations show that our solar system will probably be tossed much farther from the galactic core than it is today.

[Image: 654291main_p1220bk.jpg]
(This series of photo illustrations shows the predicted merger between the Milky Way and Andromeda as seen from Earth. The first frame is the present day; the last frame is 7 billion years from now. )

To make matters more complicated, M31's small companion, the Triangulum galaxy, M33, will join in the collision and perhaps later merge with the M31/Milky Way pair. There is a small chance that M33 will hit the Milky Way first.

A century ago astronomers did not realize that M31 was a separate galaxy far beyond the stars of the Milky Way. Edwin Hubble measured its vast distance by uncovering a variable star that served as a "milepost marker."

Hubble went on to discover the expanding universe where galaxies are rushing away from us, but it has long been known that M31 is moving toward the Milky Way at about 250,000 miles per hour. That is fast enough to travel from here to the moon in one hour. The measurement was made using the Doppler effect, which is a change in frequency and wavelength of waves produced by a moving source relative to an observer, to measure how starlight in the galaxy has been compressed by Andromeda's motion toward us.
Andromeda (movie, 200px)
A computer animation of the Milky Way - Andromeda collision.

Previously, it was unknown whether the far-future encounter will be a miss, glancing blow, or head-on smashup. This depends on M31’s tangential motion. Until now, astronomers had not been able to measure M31's sideways motion in the sky, despite attempts dating back more than a century. The Hubble Space Telescope team, led by van der Marel, conducted extraordinarily precise observations of the sideways motion of M31 that remove any doubt that it is destined to collide and merge with the Milky Way.

"This was accomplished by repeatedly observing select regions of the galaxy over a five- to seven-year period," says Jay Anderson of STScI.

"In the worst-case-scenario simulation, M31 slams into the Milky Way head-on and the stars are all scattered into different orbits," adds Gurtina Besla of Columbia University in New York, N.Y. "The stellar populations of both galaxies are jostled, and the Milky Way loses its flattened pancake shape with most of the stars on nearly circular orbits. The galaxies' cores merge, and the stars settle into randomized orbits to create an elliptical-shaped galaxy."

The space shuttle servicing missions to Hubble upgraded it with ever more-powerful cameras, which have given astronomers a long-enough time baseline to make the critical measurements needed to nail down M31's motion. The Hubble observations and the consequences of the merger are reported in three papers that will appear in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal.



SO WE ARE ALL GOING TO DIE!!!!!

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06-01-2012, 08:45 AM
Post: #2
MILKY WAY TO COLLIDE WITH ANDROMEDA
Well, I'm not holding my breath waiting for this to happen. They can't even accurately model the climate, much less the big crash that they are predicting.

Only people with oversized egos believe that mankind has caused global warming.

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06-01-2012, 01:55 PM
Post: #3
MILKY WAY TO COLLIDE WITH ANDROMEDA
Now I'm thinking on the Bright side, [no pun intended] If we see this happen it means that we've survived all that Washington can throw at us and all future BP screwups, furthermore it means....we're Immortal!!!

.....besides, the fine print on 'Galactic Collisions' is they're a great spectacle from a couple of hundred thousand light years distance but few stars 'hit each other'.

Now what's interesting is...you know what un-nameable is at the center of every galaxy, when they hit.........beam me up! Extraordinary GRB!


[..Gamma Ray Burst, cheeze!]


/smash:Easter:/blush

Joe-Nathan Wrote:GOOD NEWS ALL THIS GLOBAL WARM AND GLOBAL COOLING WON'T MATTER IN THE LONG RUN:

FROM NASA NEWS:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sci...andromeda/

Astronomers Predict Titanic Collision: Milky Way vs. Andromeda




SO WE ARE ALL GOING TO DIE!!!!!

HarvestMoon Wrote:Well, I'm not holding my breath waiting for this to happen. They can't even accurately model the climate, much less the big crash that they are predicting.

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/
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06-02-2012, 10:50 PM
Post: #4
MILKY WAY TO COLLIDE WITH ANDROMEDA
At least it will kill off the zombies

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06-15-2012, 10:32 PM
Post: #5
MILKY WAY TO COLLIDE WITH ANDROMEDA
So what came to mind was this piece on "The Biggest Galaxy"

Quote:[h=3]the biggest galaxy in the universe[/h]
IC 1101 the biggest galaxy we've found in the universe! it lives 1 billion light years away (at z = 0.0767) in the massive abell 2029 galaxy cluster. the unromantic name comes from the index catalogue which was created at the end of the 19th century.

IC 1101 floats with a girth of 6 million light years, making it 60 times larger than our milky way with its mere 100,000 light year diameter. how many stars does the most massive elliptical galaxy contain? 100,000,000,000,000 = 100 trillion = 10^14 stars. how does the number of stars in the largest galaxy in the universe compare to the number of cells in the human body? see starts with a bang to find out!

[Image: abell2029_comp.jpg]
the above right image shows the entire abell 2029 cluster in optical light from the digitized sky survey. IC 1101 is the big bright one living right at the center. the left image shows what the cluster looks like in x-ray light, as seen by the chandra telescope. the optical views shows lots of individual galaxies floating around the biggest concentration of mass that sits right at the center. the x-ray light is created by very very hot gas. the image shows a smooth distribution of multi-million degree gas, concentrated at the center of the cluster, but extending far out into the outer regions! here's another optical image...

[Image: IC_1101_dss2.jpg]
one thing i wonder... why is this the most massive galaxy in the universe? why dont galaxies get bigger? there are several galaxies at the centers of different clusters that are close to this big, but what creates an upper limit on the mass of a galaxy? (and the dark matter halo that it lives in?) basically, the limits are set by the initial distribution of matter after the big bang, time, and the expansion of the universe, but... i still wonder.


at http://amandabauer.blogspot.com/2009/02/...verse.html


IC 1101 is something like 6,000,000 light years across where "The Milky Way" is 100,000 light years across.

[Image: tumblr_lgcfb2LkoP1qb7jq7o1_500.jpg]

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